Kenpo Definitions


ANGLE OF DEFLECTION

When your “weapon” hits your target at a 45 degree angle causing a deflection or “ride off.”

 

ANGLE OF INCIDENCE

When your “weapon” hits your target at a 90 degree angle giving maximum effect.

 

BACK-UP MASS

Body weight moving in line with your strike on a horizontal plane.

 

BASICS

Any single move such as a punch, block, kick, strike, etc.

 

BLOCKS

When force meets force against a weapon in flight and the intention is not to hurt.

 

BORROWED FORCE

Using your opponent’s motion to add power to your technique or moves. “Borrowed force always has borrowed reach, but borrowed reach does not always have borrowed force.”

 

BRACING ANGLE

Angles or positions that give stability to your stances and/or strikes.

 

CAT

A transition or stance where the foot is used to change directions as you pick your line of entry. Or the foot is cocked for the sake of maximum travel when using it as a weapon meeting its target.

 

CATEGORY COMPLETION

A way of grouping moves or techniques to demonstrate parallel relationships. Example: Circling Horizon, Gathering Clouds and Leaping Crane.

 

CENTER LINE

The is the location in the center of the body where the vital targets are located, both int he front and the rear of the body.

 

CLOCK PRINCIPLE

A direction aid created by Ed Parker to assist students in learning the eight angles of attack and angles of defense.

 

COMPLIMENTARY ANGLE

Following or riding a body line/angle to a target, be it yours or the opponents. Better known as contouring.

 

COMPOUNDING

The ability to bring two basic principles together to execute two or more moves or strikes at one time or in one beat.

 

COVER OUT

A front cross-over followed by a step-through reverse, for the sake of surveying the 360 degrees of your environment while moving you away from your opponent.

 

CROSS OVER

Not a stance, but a foot maneuver. Consists of a front cross over and an additional step out. This can be done front or rear as well as in the forward or reverse direction.

 

DIRECTIONAL HARMONY

When the body, mind, spirit and weapon are all on the same path and act in unison for full effect.

 

ECONOMY OF MOTION

A term given to eliminating the “and then.” In other words, removing unnecessary motion.

 

FORMS

Kenpo Forms do not represent a fight. Instead, they teach Kenpo’s rules of motion–for every move, principle and concept, there is an opposite and a reverse.

 

FORWARD BOW

A stance where the weight is shifted forward for the sake of reach and power.

 

HORSE

There are two types of Horse Stance–a Meditating Horse which is used to clear the mind of distractions and enhance mental focus. And a Training Horse which is used to train for upper body isolation.

 

KARATE

A Japanese term meaning “Empty Hand”.

 

KENPO

An Okinawan term(Ken Po) meaning “Fist Law” or “Law of the Fist”. Originally of Chinese origin (Ch’uan Fa), although having Japanese influence as well. The American Kenpo System (Ed Parker’s Kenpo ) uses the term to mean a set of rules, concepts, principles and guidelines governing motion (action) that defines the Art and Science of modern street fighting methods.

 

KICKS

The use of the foot, knee or leg as a tool for striking.

 

MARRIAGE OF GRAVITY

Body weight dropping with your strike on a vertical plane.

 

MASTER KEY MOVE

A single move or series of moves that produces a dual effect.

 

METHOD OF EXECUTION

The method by which you deliver a blow from point of origin to target choice. For example, snap, whip, thrust, claw, hook, tear, etc.

 

NEUTRAL BOW

An uncommitted posture used as a point of reference. Some refer to this as a basic fighting stance–the CKF does not, since this stance does not have the weight balance, mind set and bracing angle position necessary to engage.

 

PARRIES

A riding force that redirects an opponents kick or punch. Parries generally follow the joint angles of the body.

 

PUNCHES

When you make contact with the front two knuckles of the fist.

 

REVERSE BOW

The basic exit stance. A position in which the weight is shifted to the back in order to create distance between you and your opponent without losing ground. Allows for low target strikes.

 

SHUFFLE

The act of using foot maneuvers to travel forward or back to help gauge the distance to effectively meet your target. Examples: push-drag, step-drag, pull-drag.

 

STEP-THROUGH

A foot maneuver used to either advance or retreat and change sides either left or right facing your opponent.

 

STRIKES

When force meets force against a weapon in flight or not, and the intent is to hurt.

 

STOMP

A form of kicking without a supporting leg.

 

STOMP-KICK

A form of kicking where you have a supporting leg. Must have a three-body-span travel distance to effectively cause damage.

 

TECHNIQUES

A fixed combination of basics used against an opponent in a given situation. Taught in three phases: – the “Ideal” Phase (model), the “What If” phase, and “Formulation” (grafting) phase.

 

TORQUE

The act of twisting. There are two types of torque: direct-torque and counter-torque. Direct torque is when the body and arm are moving in the same direction. Counter-torque exists when there is a push-pull counter-force such as when one rips paper.

 

TWIST-THROUGH

An advanced foot maneuver which shows two stances linked by a foot maneuver. Demonstrated in Long Form 2 and used to show a difference in timing in rotating the body. Can be followed by either an advance or retreat. You may then reverse the principle and show distance then rotation either to advance or retreat.

 

WIDE KNEEL

Version 1: a low but wide posture for bracing to enhance the ability to deal with all angles of attack without losing balance. Version 2: High Wide Kneel–the basic fighting stance used for the act of engagement (it eliminates the need to prepare to launch).

 

ZONE OF SANCTUARY

Using this principle, a circle is put into a square. The four corners of the square became the Zones of Sanctuary (i.e.) safety.